skip to main content

Diversity & Inclusion


fsdfasd

Diversity & Inclusion Drive Excellence

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Phasellus sed tortor leo. Sed in leo sed mi laoreet tempus maximus vitae lectus. Mauris malesuada eget ligula eget volutpat. Ut non pulvinar massa, sit amet lobortis mauris. Donec turpis nulla, lobortis sed consectetur at, pellentesque at libero. Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Phasellus sed tortor leo. Sed in leo sed mi laoreet tempus maximus vitae lectus. Mauris malesuada eget ligula eget volutpat. Ut non pulvinar massa, sit amet lobortis mauris. Donec turpis nulla, lobortis sed consectetur at, pellentesque at libero.

Growing up, I was fortunate enough to be surrounded by Latino role models with a relentless drive for improving their communities and the lives of those around them through medicine. These examples have instilled in me that same drive. As a researcher and an active Latina scientist in my community, I hope to make lasting impacts on my generation and those to come. Medical research has given me a unique opportunity to make a large-scale impact on people suffering from diseases. I hope to show other young Latinx and Hispanic future scientists that they can make huge advancements in medicine through science and the distinct point-of-view their backgrounds bring to the table.

Alexandra Powell

As an undergraduate student at A&M, I was never truly appreciative of the Aggie core values, but after reviewing them and treating them like words that carry weight, I realized that they are the things I want to bring into practice. As a future health professional, my main goal is to genuinely make an impact on people's lives and health. I hope to impact their lives not just with the services I offer, but with the way I interact with them; I want them to feel comfortable, important and cared for. I want these attributes to be the defining factors for me as well as the physicians that come after me because it takes more than a professional degree to be an effective health provider and caregiver. I hope that my belief in these values will translate to others wanting to do the same thing, if not better. ‘Leading by example’ is how I hope to influence the health profession and make it better for the current and future generations.

Anna Amune

I am a proud Venezuelan-American. It is so important to celebrate our Hispanic Heritage and the diversity of our student body. We cherish the rich history, vibrant culture and societal contributions of members from the Latinx community. Then, hopefully by celebrating our diversity, we can grow to become open-minded and inclusive physicians that can ultimately provide our patients with better quality care.

Catherine Jane Fergie

I hope to remove some of the stereotypes and stigmas associated with the indigent population. Sometimes many physicians are not faced with those kinds of issues or hardships growing up, so many times they do not know how to react. I would like to help those in need and show them that just because they started in that situation, if they have had hardships, does not mean that they cannot move forward or do better than the generation before them. As such, I am a first generation college student and first generation medical student. On top of that, I come from a history of many adverse events such as familial addiction, constant changes in where I call home, etc. It is okay to be the first one. YOU DO BELONG.

Cerci Hammons

My diversity and inclusion experience in health care has been about bridging gaps which prevent minority groups from achieving high-quality healthcare. We bridge gaps in representation, which inspires future physicians from our communities who look like us and know our unique struggles. We bridge gaps in access, which helps make health care affordable across all income levels, brings high-value care to underserved communities and eliminates negative social determinants of health. We bridge gaps in patient knowledge, which facilitates all aspects of health from nutrition to mental wellbeing. We bridge gaps in healthcare provider knowledge, which includes everything from transgender terminology to implicit biases. And, just as important, we bridge emotional gaps, which shares a love and compassion for each other that already exists, but, sometimes, can be hard to feel.

Christian Martin

As a biracial individual, one significant personal challenge that I’ve encountered is identity. This experience has granted me the ability to identify with both cultures that define who I am as well as develop a sincere appreciation and willingness to understand other cultures. It has also allowed me to see the world from a different perspective and overcome many challenges that not everyone has to endure. These circumstances have helped create the person that I am today and guided my decision to pursue a profession where I can make a positive impact in the lives of others. As a future doctor, I pray for the opportunity to work with a diverse group of individuals with many backgrounds, of all ages, genders, races and ethnicities. One day, I hope to develop lasting relationships and provide quality treatment for all of my patients. I would also like to contribute to creating a better society through the compassionate care of all people.

Dennis Garcia-Rhodes

We should, as much as possible, eliminate latent biases and discrimination against members of marginalized groups within health care itself. Every member of the health care team should feel comfortable being themselves and being present on the team regardless of their identity. You cannot have meaningful diversity without also having inclusion.

Gideon Oyekanmi

Patients are more receptive when they feel they can identify with the medical professionals treating them. To fully represent our patient needs and be an advocate for them, it is important that we have competence in medicine. To have competency, we have to diversify our thinking. To diversify our thinking, we have to evolve in every way possible.

Mikaila Singleton

I was born and raised in El Paso, Texas, a town on the US-Mexico border. My identity as a Mexican-American woman and daughter of immigrants shaped many of my goals as a medical student and future physician. At Texas A&M College of Medicine, I had the pleasure of working with Dr. Bryn Esplin on research that assessed how immigration policies impacted health care. Together, we worked, not only to understand the impact of these policies on the immigrant community’s health, but to also find ways we, as health care providers, can work within that community’s unique set of socioeconomic barriers and ensure we take care of ALL patients, regardless of their background. I strive to one day build a practice where no one is scared to seek medical attention because of who they are or where they come from.

Monica Sosa

I have a passion for mentoring. As a result, I have been fortunate in my journey to be elected into the College of Medicine Admissions Committee as a student member, The Latino Medical Student Association (LMSA) vice-president of external affairs and the Southwest Regional LMSA co-director. These roles have allowed me to mentor other Latino and minority students wanting to enter the medical field and advocate for better health care to help our underserved Latino communities.

Victor Hugo Rodriguez

MAKING WHAT IF POSSIBLE

For us, "what if" is not a simple question. It's what we wake up for. As part of the Texas A&M Health Science Center, we find solutions to the seemingly impossible questions facing health care. We ask "what if" and then we make it possible.

Michael Junior
"I believe diversity in health care begins with a system of providers that reflects the diversity of the population we serve. Diversity encompasses so much more than just the color of our skin but should include the individual things that make us who we are as people such as gender identity, socioeconomic status, sexual orientation and, most importantly, our beliefs and life experiences.”

Michael Junior

College of Medicine Student

Get to Know Michael

We are committed

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Phasellus sed tortor leo. Sed in leo sed mi laoreet tempus maximus vitae lectus. Mauris malesuada eget ligula eget volutpat. Ut non pulvinar massa, sit amet lobortis mauris. Donec turpis nulla, lobortis sed consectetur at, pellentesque at libero.

Race & Ethnicity

Race & Ethnicity 2019 Statistics
  • White:
    42%
  • Asian:
    37%
  • Hispanic:
    10%
  • African American:
    8%
  • Undisclosed:
    4%
  • Pacific Islander:
    1%
  • Other:
    1%

Gender

Gender 2019 Statistics
  • Male:
    54%
  • Female:
    46%

State Residency

State Residency 2019 Statistics
  • Texas Residency:
    94%
  • Non-Resident:
    6%

University Representation

University Representation 2019 Statistics
  • Graduates of a university in Texas:
    80%
  • Graduates of a university outside of Texas:
    20%
Michael Junior
"A diverse representation of medical professionals is important because our patients are diverse. With each passing decade, the United States is becoming even more of a melting pot, and I believe that, as such, the demographics of medical professionals should be reflective of the American public.”

Clyde Fomunung

College of Medicine Student

Get to Know Clyde

CELEBRATING WOMEN IN MEDICINE

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Phasellus sed tortor leo. Sed in leo sed mi laoreet tempus maximus vitae lectus. Mauris malesuada eget ligula eget volutpat. Ut non pulvinar massa, sit amet lobortis mauris. Donec turpis nulla, lobortis sed consectetur at, pellentesque at libero.